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I asked Balasaheb Thackeray, “Are you a mafioso?” — and lived to tell the tale

I asked Balasaheb Thackeray, “Are you a mafioso?” — and lived to tell the tale

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Updates from : the Print : Bal Thackeray was India’s only purely parochial leader. He was also his own brand manager and a man deeply in love with himself. Was Balasaheb Thackeray a mass leader or a mafioso? The truth is, you will find his followers and detractors only describe him in extremes. But both will agree on one thing, that he was one of a kind, an original. I learnt how much of an original he was when, in a ‘National Interest’ article more than a decade ago, I described him and his party as mafiosi. My phone rang late that Saturday evening as I sat with my family at dinner in Baan Thai restaurant (shut down in 2005) in the basement of New Delhi’s Oberoi. It was a call from Balasaheb in Mumbai. I went out looking for better signal and braced myself for a diatribe.
Indian women are getting assaulted on Tinder dates and no one knows how to stop it

Indian women are getting assaulted on Tinder dates and no one knows how to stop it

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Updates from : the Print : Most women are reluctant to report matches from dating apps fearing retribution, which leaves the assaulters free to pursue others. New Delhi: Stumbling upon the man who sexually assaulted you isn’t something you would expect when casually scrolling through profiles, but for several urban women, it’s more common than you think. Even more common is matching up with sexual assaulters. While apps like Tinder and Hinge have helped liberate women by removing, even if to a small degree, the stigma attached to casual sex, one hard truth is becoming increasingly clear: Women are getting assaulted on their dates and see no recourse in the organisations that set them up. The implications of this are startling – men who have assaulted a ‘match’ continue t
‘Golden opportunities to tranquilize Avni missed’

‘Golden opportunities to tranquilize Avni missed’

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Updates from : the Hindu : Even as this month’s shooting of Avni, the tigress that is said to have killed 13 villagers, remains a subject of intense debate, a letter written by a forest department official in September to Maharashtra’s Chief Wildlife Warden reveals the disquiet over the manner in which the search for the elusive cat was being pursued.   “Two golden opportunities to execute the Chief Wildlife Warden’s (CWW) order — to tranquilise Avni, the tigress, in a very prompt and scientific way was missed,” K.M Abharna, Deputy Conservator of Forests (DSF) Pandharkawada, wrote in a letter to the CWW. “As per the meeting held on September 12, 2018, by CWW to strategise the course of action for next 7 days, the operation was commenced from September 13, 2018,” Ms
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