Environment

Why covering the environment is one of the most hazardous beats in journalism

Why covering the environment is one of the most hazardous beats in journalism

Environment
Updates from : the Print : Journalists who cover environment are at heightened risk of murder, arrest, assault, threats, self-exile, lawsuits and harassment. From the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Kashoggi by Saudi agents to President Trump’s clashes with the White House press corps, attacks on reporters are in the news. This problem extends far beyond the politics beat, and world leaders aren’t the only threats. At Michigan State University’s Knight Center for Environmental Journalism, we train students and professional journalists to report on what we view as the world’s most important beat. One hard fact is that those who cover it are at heightened risk of murder, arrest, assault, threats, self-exile, lawsuits and harassment. In a recent study, I explored this problem
Five go away to the jungle

Five go away to the jungle

Environment
Updates from : The Hindu : The principal and lecturers of Women’s Christian College, Chennai, explore the lush environs of Assam and return from encounters with the wild kind Assam with its fabulous wildlife has always been on our bucket list, but seemed an impossible pipe dream for us academicians as most wildlife parks close in May. Keen to try our luck in late April, we landed in Guwahati and were soon speeding towards Manas National Park, a UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site, Project Tiger and Project Elephant Reserve situated in the foothills of the Eastern Himalayas. We saw herds of chital, swamp deer and hog deer in the marshy grasslands, while peacocks, their tail feathers shimmering in the sweltering sunshine, vied with coppery chestnut brown coucals to get our attent
‘Fish-lizard’ fossil from Kutch is a Jurassic first

‘Fish-lizard’ fossil from Kutch is a Jurassic first

Environment
Updates from : The Hindu : The 5.5 metre ichthyosaur, believed to be at least 90 million years old, points to India’s evolutionary links A near-complete Jurassic-era fossil of an intriguing animal that looks like a mashup of a dolphin and lizard has been unearthed in Kutch, Gujarat. Ichthyosaurs or ‘fish- lizards’ in Greek were large reptiles that lived at the same time as dinosaurs. While many ichthyosaur fossils have been found in North America and Europe, the fossil record in the Southern Hemisphere has mostly been limited to South America and Australia. Guntupalli Prasad, a geologist at the University of Delhi, said when a fossil bone from the animal’s skeleton was first found by an Indo-German research team in Kutch in 2016, they suspected it to belong to a dinosaur. “But
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